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ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1970-1971 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



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CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1970-1971 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

Eastern Province 
Society of The Divine Word 

Northern Province 



5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 








Mtt^'^"*-i '-■ ci>« :-M;. ■:-> Si»l^^^.S 



TABLF OF CONTENTS 




4 CALENDAR 

5 A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 
7 GENERAL INFORMATION 

13 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

23 STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

27 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1970-1971 



FALL QUARTER, 1970 




September 23-25 


Orientation for First- Year Students 


September 24-25 


Registration for all Students 


September 28 


Classes Begin 


October 24 


St. Francis Day 


October 24-November 3 


Recess During Congressional 




Elections 


November 26-29 


Thanksgiving Recess 


November 30-December 1 


Registration for Winter Quarter 


December 8 


Feast of the Immaculate Conception 




— No Classes 


December 16 


Classes End for Fall Quarter 


December 18 


Fall Quarter Ends 


WINTER QUARTER, 1971 




January 4 


Winter Quarter Begins (Registration 




for New Students) 


February 12 


Servite Founders' Day — No Classes 


February 22-23 


Registration for Spring Quarter 


March 12 


Classes End for Winter Quarter 


March 17 


Winter Quarter Ends 


SPRING QUARTER, 1971 




March 29 


Spring Quarter Begins (Registration 




for New Students) 


April 8-11 


Easter Recess 


April 28 


St. Paul's Day— No Classes 


May 20 


Ascension Thursday — No Classes 


June 2 


Classes End 


June 4 


Spring Quarter Ends 


June 6 


Final Convocation 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



In the fall of 1968 the Catholic Theological Union began its work 
as a school of theology preparing students for the Roman Catholic 
priesthood. The growth and development of our school during 
these first two years have far exceeded our anticipations. 

The Catholic Theological Union came into being at a most pro- 
pitious time. Within the Roman Catholic community there was a 
growing demand for a new direction in seminary education. Vati- 
can II had defined the seminary as a school of ministry. The future 
priest should come out of isolation and into living contact with the 
men he would serve. And within the American seminary communi- 
ty, there was a heightened awareness that theology is best done in 
an ecumenical setting and in relation to the world of the university. 

These ideals were reflected in our decision to locate in Hyde Park, 
a cultural crossroads near the University of Chicago. Within walk- 
ing distance are the Divinity School of the University and three 
Protestant seminaries. The CTU charter orders, Franciscans, Serv- 
ite^ and Passionists, decided to join their resources of faculty, li- 
braries and student body, to form a new collaborative model in 
theological education. 

A notable advance was made in the June of this year, when the 
Society of the Divine Word became the fourth member of the Cath- 
olic Theological Union corporation. With missions across the 
world, the Society of the Divine Word brings a rich tradition to 
CTU. Under the direction of experienced professors of the Society, 
a program of mission studies will be inaugurated in the fall of 
1970. 

The Catholic Theological Union is an open-ended corporation. 
Our charter makes provision for full membership in the Union for 
religious Orders which wish to participate in this promising venture 
in theological education. Membership brings with it the right to a 
voice in school policy through representatives on the Board of Trus- 
tees. Competent scholars of member Orders are offered a position 
on the CTU faculty. Groups which do not wish to become formal 
members of the corporation can, of course, enroll students on a 
tuitional basis. 



CTU has experienced a rapid growth. Besides the four corporate 
members, students from the Augustinians, Norbertines, the Society 
of the Precious Blood, the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart and 
the Conventual Franciscans will be in attendance in 1970-71. A 
class of 60 first-year students will up the total enrollment to over 150. 

On April 16, 1970, the long awaited Directory of the Secretariat 
for the Promotion of Christian Unity was published in Rome. This 
courageous and large-minded directive gives notable approval and 
impetus to ecumenical cooperation at the level of theological 
education. It is most timely, therefore, that this year has seen 
the formalizing of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, 
centered in Hyde Park. As a charter member of the cluster, CTU 
is entering a program of broad collaboration with six schools of 
theology. A vote of confidence in the future of the Chicago Cluster 
was given when the Bellarmine School of Theology (Jesuit) an- 
nounced it would re-locate in Hyde Park in the fall of 1970. 

It has been our plan, once we know the eventual size and shape 
of the Catholic Theological Union, to construct an academic facility 
adjacent to the campus. However, in the present fluid state of semi- 
nary education, we have felt that it was best to observe the signs 
of the times and postpone any move that might prove to be pre- 
mature. The wisdom of this decision has been verified by the rapid 
development of the Chicago Cluster. It now appears that some 
common sharing of academic facilities by the CCTS will be de- 
veloped. 

It is becoming increasingly evident that theological education will 
focus in a relatively few major centers. Chicago is certainly one of 
them. And we are confident that the action will be based in Hyde 
Park. Catholic Theological Union invites interested groups or indi- 
viduals to share in our new and exciting venture. 



Sincerely yours, 

Paul I. Bechtold, C.P. 

President 

Catholic Theological Union 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



ACCREDITATION 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 



LIBRARY 



CLASSROOM FACILITIES 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 



FEES 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



The Catholic Theological Union at Chicago can truly be called a 
product of Vatican II. The trends in the Catholic Church which 
were reflected in the Council and blessed by it make a new approach 
to seminary training imperative. Both the spirit and the letter of 
such documents as that on Priestly Training, Ecumenism and the 
Church In The Modern World, high-light the necessity of theologi- 
cal training being given in an open and ecumenical setting. 

During the past decade, too, Catholic educators have been in- 
creasingly vocal in pointing out that an isolated, understaffed and 
unaccredited theological seminary cannot possibly give the theologi- 
cal education demanded by the priestly ministry of today and to- 
morrow. In a recent survey, of 381 Catholic major seminaries in the 
United States, 166 (4l%) had fewer than 50 students. Increasingly, 
educators have suggested that Catholic seminaries combine their 
resources in library and faculty and if possible move into living con- 
tact with the university and other seminaries. 

Nor has this been exclusively a Roman Catholic concern. Protes- 
tant seminary professors and administrators have long been aware 
of "the problem of the small seminary." In the report. Ministry 
For Tomorrow, the Special Committee on Theological Education of 
the Episcopal Church calls for the re-location of seminaries in an 
urban setting, in contact with seminaries of other faiths, and near 
a university. 

In May, 1964, Cardinal Suenens visited the University of Chicago 
for a series of lectures and ecumenical dialogue. As a result of the 
good spirit engendered by this visit, Dean Jerald Brauer of the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago met with scholars from 
several Catholic religious orders to discuss the possibility of a Catho- 
lic seminary locating near the campus. Since a move was seen to 
have exciting potential. Besides the Divinity School of the Univer- 
sity, three Protestant theological schools are located on or near the 
campus. The opportunities for scholarly collaboration and ecumeni- 
cal cooperation are at once evident. 



Conversations continued during 1964 and 1965. Three orders 
eventually decided to move to the University of Chicago area: the 
Franciscans of Sacred Heart Province, the Passionists of Holy Cross 
Province, and the Servites of the Midwest Province. 

The Franciscans had conducted St. Joseph Seminary at Teutopolis, 
Illinois, since 1862. The Servite seminary at Lake Bluff, lUinois, 
was successor to the first Servite seminary in Chicago dating from 
1880. The Passionists had begun theological training in St. Louis 
in 1906. 



In January, 1967, Cardinal Cody gave his approval for the estab- 
lishment of a combined seminary of the three orders near the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. An organizational committee now moved plans 
ahead rapidly. Committees for curriculum, spiritual formation, ad- 
ministration and real estate were set up at a joint meeting of the 
three faculties in May, 1967. A Board of Trustees from the three 
orders was selected and on August 25, 1967, elected Rev. Paul I. 
Bechtold, C.P., first president of the school. At a second general 
meeting the shape of the curriculum and problems of staffing were 
settled. Definite structure resulted when the State of Illinois granted 
corporate status to the school in November, 1967, under title of 
The Catholic Theological Union at Chicago. 

Meanwhile intensive real estate search had located several desir- 
able sites in the neighborhood of the University of Chicago. In 
February, 1968, it was decided to purchase the Aragon Hotel, 5401 
Cornell, in East Hyde Park, a location about one mile from the 
campus. This would serve as a temporary home for the Catholic 
Theological Union. Plans call for an academic facility to be con- 
structed at the campus proper a some future time. Title to the 
Aragon was taken in April, 1968. Extensive remodeling has re- 
sulted in an excellent adaptation of the building to academic and 
residential use. 

Because of the superb location of the Catholic Theological Union 
and the trend among Catholic seminaries to combine resources and 
move into relationship with the university and seminaries of other 
faiths, there is every reason to believe that this venture will prove 
to be a significant breakthrough in Catholic seminary education. 



ACCREDITATION 

The Catholic Theological Union is incorporated in the State of 
Illinois as an institution of higher learning. The evaluation by the 
Department of Higher Education, State of Illinois, has been satis- 
factorily completed and CTU has been empowered to grant appro- 
priate degrees by State charter. 

A new school must undergo a period of rigorous evaluation and 
self -study before it is granted accreditation. In no instance can a 
school be accredited until one class has passed through its complete 
program and has graduated. 

In June, 1969, the Catholic Theological Union was granted as- 
sociate membership in the American Association of Theological 
Schools, the professional accrediting agency for theological schools. 
While associate membership is not accreditation, it is a preliminary 
step toward that goal. It is hoped that CTU will achieve AATS 
accreditation in 1971-72. 

A collaborative program, by which a student at CTU can earn the 
degree of Master of Arts in Theology from De Paul University, 
went into effect in the fall of 1969- This arrangement described on 
page 32, gives CTU students an exciting option in their prepara- 
tion for ministry. 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 

The Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building 
containing some 185 rooms plus lounge areas and dining facilities. 
On the first floor are the receptionist's offices, a large lounge, the 
dining room and other service areas. The administrative offices, 
faculty offices, faculty lounge and seminar rooms are located on the 
second floor. The library and library offices occupy the entire third 
floor. The remaining six floors furnish residence for the faculty and 
students, with individual community chapels and recreational facili- 
ties. 

The Catholic Theological Union is located in the Hyde Park- 
Kenwood area of Chicago's south side. This is a cosmopolitan, vital 
community, with a strong sense of identity. Within walking distance 
are shopping centers, theaters, restaurants, churches, parks, the Lake 

10 



Michigan beaches aiid the Museum of Science and Industry. Down- 
town Chicago is less than 15 minutes away by car or rapid transit. 
It is close to the University of Chicago and to the several schools of 
theology in the area: Chicago Theological Seminary, Lutheran 
School of Theology, Meadville Theological School, and the Bellar- 
mine School of Theology. 

It is not required that students reside in the CTU building. One 
group of Franciscans live in an apartment community near the school. 
The Augustinians reside at Mendel High School. Holy Spirit Priory 
in nearby Kenwood serves as the Norbertine residence. The Divine 
Word Community will have its residence in the immediate vicinity. 
A seminary which intends moving from its present location might 
consider purchasing a building of a size to serve its needs in the 
vicinity of CTU. As the school grows it is expected that a variety 
of residential patterns will be established. 



LIBRARY 

The entire third floor of the Catholic Theological Union houses 
the library. The area has been renovated to contain a large reading 
and reference room. Besides offices for the library staff, there are 
cataloging and work rooms. 

The present collection consists of about 60,000 volumes, a com- 
bination of the libraries of the previously independent theologates 
of two of the charter members of CTU. Virtually all of the neces- 
sary^ periodicals for theological study and related areas of research, 
some 450 in number, are currently being received. 

With the entrance of the Divine Word Fathers into the CTU 
Corporation, arrangements are being made for the incorporation of 
the extensive Missiological collection of the former Divine Word 
Seminary Library into the CTU Library. The Collection represents 
some 5,000 volumes in mission studies and the history of religions. 

The proximit}^ of the libraries of the other theological schools in 
the area and of the library of the University of Chicago, especially 
of the Divinity School and the Oriental Institute, affords broad and 
valuable possibilities for consultation and research. 

11 



Students at the Catholic Theological Union enjoy reciprocal library 
privileges with the Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary and Meadville Theological School. 

The library staff consists of two co-directors, trained in both the- 
ology and library science, together with assistants for cataloging 
and circulation. 



CLASSROOMS 

The education building of the Chicago Sinai Congregation is 
located at 5350 South Shore Drive, one block east of CTU. By 
special arrangement one floor of the education building, containing 
eight classrooms, has been made available to CTU. This arrange- 
ment has served well during 1969-70 and will be continued. In addi- 
tion, a number of seminar rooms for smaller groups are located in 
the CTU building. These facilities are adequate for our academic 
needs for the immediate future. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and area parks with golf and tennis 
facilities are in easy walking distance from CTU. An arrangement 
is in effect by which CTU students make use of the Hyde Park 
YMCA athletic facilities, which include swimming pool, gymnasium, 
squash and handball courts. 



FEES (For the Academic Year, 1970-71*) 

Tuition $1,200.00 per year 

400.00 per quarter 

Special Students (for credit or audit) 100.00 per course 

Student Activity Fee 4.00 per quarter 

Board (September 1 - June 15) 750.00 

250.00 per quarter 

12 



Private Room 750.00 per year 

250.00 per quarter 

Double Occupancy 450.00 per year 

(per person) 

150.00 per quarter 
(per person) 

* By a decision of The Board of Trustees of The Catholic Theo- 
logical Union tuition rates will be increased to $500.00 per quarter 
(125.00 per course), effective September, 1971. 



13 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 



FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President 

Vice President and Dean 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Coordinator of Student 
Activities 

Registrar 

Co-Directors, Library 



Paul Bechtold, C.P. 
Hugh McElwain, O.S.M. 
James Hartke, O.F.M. 
John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Judith Hochberg 

Myron Gohmann, C.P. 
Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Paul Boyle, C.P. (Provincial) 

John Donaghey, S.V.D. (Provincial) 

Vitus Duschinsky, O.F.M. (Provincial) 

Justin Ryska, O.S.M. (Provincial) 

Robert Flinn, S.V.D. 

Mark Hegener, O.F.M. 

Robert Kohl, O.F.M. 

Augustine Kulbis, O.S.M. 

Conleth Overman, C.P. 

16 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 

Dismas Bonner, O.F.M., J.C.D. 
Karl Gersbach, O.S.A., M.A. 
George Lubeley, C.PP.S., M.A. 
Daniel Malain, C.P., M.Div. 
Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D., L.Miss., M.A. 
John Paul, M.S.C, J.C.D. 
John Pawlikowski, O.S.M., Ph.D. 



FACULTY 

AP^ERN, Barnabas, CP. (on leave in Rome) 
Professor of New Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 
S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 
LL.D. University of Notre Dame (Honorary) 

AHNER, Eugene, S.V.D. 

Assistant proefssor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Gregorian University, Rome 

Ph.D. (Cand.) Fordham University, New York 

BEHNEN, Max, O.F.M. 

Assistant professor of Doctrinal Theology 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

BOBERG, John, S.V.D. 

Asisstant Professor in Mission Theology 
S.T.L. Gregorian University, Rome 
D.Miss. Ibid. 

17 



BONNER, Dismas, O.F.M. 
Lecturer in Canon Law 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. Ibid. 

BORNTRAGER, Conrad, O.S.M. 
Instructor in Mission Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty Marianum, Rome 
M.A. (Missiology) The Catholic University of America 

Lie. in Hist. University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium 

CROTTY, Nicholas, C.P. 

Associate Professor of Moral Theology 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

S.T.L. University of St. Thomas, Rome 

CUNNINGHAM, Thomas, O.S.M. 
Lecturer in Canon Law 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. Ibid. 

FINNEGAN, Eugene, O.S.M. 

Instructor in Liturgy and Sacramental Theology 
A.B. Loyola University, Chicago 

M.A. University of Louvain, Belgium 

S.T.L. University of Trier, Germany 
S.T.D. (Cand.) Ibid. 

FOURNELLE, Geron, O.F.M. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 
L.G. in SS. Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem 
S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

GEANEY, Dennis, O.S.A. 

Director of Field Education, Lecturer in Ministry 
A.B. Villanova University, Pittsburgh 

M.A. Catholic University of America (Econ) 

Bentley School of Accounting and Finance, Boston 

GOHMANN, Myron, C.P. 
Co-Director of Library 
L. Hist. E. Gregorian University, Rome 
A.M.L.S. Rosary College, River Forest, 111. 

18 



HARTKE, James, O.F.M. 

Lecturer in Business Ethics 

B.A. Quincy College, Quincy, 111. 

M.B.A. DePaul University, Chicago 

HAYES, Zachary, O.F.M. 

Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany 

Th.D. Ibid. 



KARRIS, Robert, O.F.M. 

Instructor in New Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

Th.D. (Cand.) Harvard Divinity School 

KNIES, Jerome, O.S.A. 
Lecturer in Patristics 

B.A. Villanova University, Pittsburgh 

S.T.D. Catholic University of America, Washington 

LANGERHOLZ, CalUstus, O.F.M. 

' Associate Professor of New Testament Studies 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 



MacDONALD, Sebastian, C.P. 

Associate Professor of Moral Theology 
S.T.L. University of St. Thomas, Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 



McELWAIN, Hugh, O.S.M. 

Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty Marianum, Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

Graduate Studies in Education, DePaul University. 

NEMER, Lawrence, S.V.D. 

Associate Professor of Church History 
L.Miss. Gregorian University, Rome 
M.A. History, Catholic University of America, Washington 

19 



NEWBOLD, Thomas More, CP. 

Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Maitre-es-Sc-Med. LTnstitut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 

Grand 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada 

O'MALLEY, Kenneth, C.P. 1 

Co-Director of Library 
A.M.L.S. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

OSTDIEK, Gilbert, O.F.M. (Sabbatical Leave 1970-1971) 
Associate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

PAWLIKOWSKI, John, O.S.M. 

Instructor in Ethics and Ministry 

A.B. Loyola University, Chicago 

Diploma in Jewish Studies, Institute of Jewish Studies, 

Wheeling College 
Ph.D. University of Chicago 

PERELMUTER, Hayim Goren 

Visiting Chautauqua Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A. McGill University, Montreal 

M.H.L. Jewish Institute of Religion, New York 

Advanced Studies, Guggenheim Fellow, Israel 

Arabic Studies, Harvard University 
D.H.L. (Cand.) Hebrew Union College — Hebrew University 
D.D. (Honorary) Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati 

SKERRY, Donald, S.V.D. 

Assistant Professor of Preaching 

S.T.L. Gregorian University, Rome 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

M.A. (Cand.) in Speech, Northwestern University 

STUHLMUELLER, Carroll, CP. 

Professor of Old Testament Studies 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

S.S.L. The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 
' D.H.L. St. Benedict College, (Hon) 

20 



ADJUNCT FACULTY: 



Dr. Jerry Spiegel (and Team) 
Educational Consultants 



Rev. Thomas Heaney 
St. Thomas the Apostle 
Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Eugene Mainelli, O.P. 

Center for Studies in Religious Education 

Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Robert Mallonee, S.V.D. 
Pastoral Supervisor 
Society of the Divine Word 

Rev. Roger Mercurio, C.P. 
Pastor, Immaculate Conception 
Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Raymond Sullivan 

Newman Center, University of Illinois 

Chicago Circle Campus 



21 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING 



COORDINATOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



WORSHIP 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING 

The thorough preparation of candidates for the ministry of the 
CathoHc priesthood is a task that goes beyond the areas of academic 
and professional instruction. It involves the development of char- 
acter and Christian virtue. Likewise a sense of social responsibility 
must be fostered, bringing the candidate to an awareness of the de- 
mands of selfless service. While this is not the direct responsibility 
of the Catholic Theological Union, it is a matter of notable concern 
for the administration and faculty of the school. 

This facet of the student's development is remanded to the Direc- 
tors of Spiritual Formation of the several participating communities. 
By means of public conferences, group discussion and individual 
guidance sessions, the theologian is assisted in formulating ideals of 
life and service that are essential to commitment in the priestly 
ministry. 

The Directors of Spiritual Formation live in residence with the 
student community. They are available at all times for consultation 
and advice. Care is taken that this service does not produce depend- 
ent persons, but rather promotes full human and spiritual maturity. 



COORDINATOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to the Directors of Formation the School maintains 
an office of the Coordinator of Student Activities. The Coordinator 
provides personal and academic counselling to all interested stu- 
dents. He also assists them with all matters not directly pertaining 
to the Office of the Dean of Studies. The Coordinator has direct 
responsibility for those students who have no specific spiritual direc- 
tor available to them. 



WORSHIP 

An integral aspect of education for ministry is the development 
of a liturgical way of life. The priest is not only a teacher of truth; 
he is president of a worshipping community. Worship in faith has 
ever been considered a necessary adjunct to the fruitful mastery of 
Christian theology. 

24 



At the Catholic Theological Union the participating communities 
determine their own prayer and worship schedule. A school chapel 
is available for the use of all the communities. On major Church 
festival and other appropriate occasions the school holds official 
liturgies for the entire faculty and student body. These liturgies 
are prepared by the Coordinator of Student Activities with the as- 
sistance of the professor of liturgy and a student committee. Be- 
sides communal worship, students are also expected to devote time 
each day to personal reflection and private prayer. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

An important aspect of student activity at CTU is the Student 
Executive Committee. This committee of five students is elected by 
the student body at large. It serves as liaison between student body 
and administration. It represents student viewpoint and interest. At 
the same time, the SEC promotes student activities of an academic, 
religious and social nature. Matters of student discipline affecting 
the whole school are a responsibility, although not exclusively, of 
the SEC. 

In line with good educational practice, students at CTU place 
elected representatives on the Administrative Council of the School, 
and also on all key committees such as Curriculum, Evaluation and 
Recruitment, etc. 



25 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 
APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 
CURRICULUM 
FIELD EDUCATION 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 
PROGRAM IN MISSION STUDIES 
CHICAGO CLUSTER 
COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students applying for admission at the Catholic Theological 
Union must have a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or 
university. Beyond this the Committee on Admissions prefers to 
evaluate each applicant on an individual basis. An oral interview 
with the prospective student will be required, unless he is sponsored 
by a participating religious community. 

Pre- theological studies are the subject of much discussion and 
revision at the present time. Roman Catholic pre-theological educa- 
tion has always emphasized the need for a strong background in the 
humanities with special emphasis on scholastic philosophy. For the 
larger Christian theological community the Statement on Pre-Semi- 
nary Studies, adopted by the American Association of Theological 
Schools, furnishes significant guidelines. 

Traditionally, theological schools in America have expected 
their students to prepare themselves for theological study by 
a broad undergraduate program in the liberal arts. When it 
came to a choice of concentration, students were often encour- 
aged to major in classical languages, history or philosophy. 

Today, however, because of the wide range of undergraduate 
programs and majors offered by a great diversity of institu- 
tions of higher education, it is no longer feasible nor realistic to 
demand one particular type of undergraduate preparation as a 
prerequisite for theological study. Some of the ablest students 
in our theological schools have made their decision to prepare 
for the ministry after their undergraduate study was completed, 
or even after a period of time in an occupation apparently un- 
connected with the Church's ministry. 

In every case, the student contemplating theological study 
should correspond at the very earliest opportunity with the 
school or schools to which he intends to apply and with the 
authorities of his church in order to learn what will best pre- 
pare him for the specific program he intends to enter. It is 
the judgment of the A ATS that a normative pattern of pre- 
seminary studies will include many of the following: 

English language and literature; history, including non- 
western cultures as well as European and American; philos- 

28 



ophy, particularly its history and methods; natural sciences, 
both the physical and the life sciences; social sciences, where 
psychology, sociology and anthropology are especially appro- 
priate; the fine arts and music, especially for their creative and 
symbolic values; biblical and modern languages; religion, 
both in the Judaeo-Christian and in the Near and Far Eastern 
traditions. 

Some seminaries require Greek or Hebrew for admission, 
and many advanced biblical courses are offered in the original 
tongues; modern languages have an immensely educative role 
and are required at the graduate studies level. 

In many seminaries students who have been well prepared 
in religion and equipped with the tools of theological study 
will be set free, not to complete their theological courses more 
quickly, but rather to pursue more advanced studies. The prin- 
ciple constantly to be kept in mind is not that of satisfying 
paper regulations and minimum requirements, but of making 
the most of opportunities for education. 

This statement, adopted by the Association after considera- 
tion and study by its membership, is issued for the guidance of 
persons considering application to a seminary and their ad- 
visors. In no way does it bind or limit the seminaries in their 
admissions policies. Each seminary is free to set its own en- 
trance and make-up requirements, to add to this statement or 
change its emphases. (AATS, Bulletin 27, June, 1966, pp. 35-6, 
passim.^ 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 

Students who wish to enroll at the Catholic Theological Union 
should forward the following documents to the office of the Dean 
of Studies at least three months in advance of the beginning of 
classes: 

1 ) Formal application for admission to be obtained from the Dean's 
office; 

2) Transcripts of all college or academic work after high school, 
including novitiate and summer sessions; 

3) Scores from the Graduate Record Examination; 

4) A check or money order in the amount of $10.00 in payment of 
the application fee. 

29 



CURRICULUM 



INTRODUCTION 

Curriculum is an area of continuing thought and imagination in 
any academic program. Curriculum design is still somewhat open 
at the Catholic Theological Union, especially in view of the on- 
going efforts to develop the variety of programs that are needed for 
the diversified student population. Of primary concern at present is 
a curriculum structure that will incorporate sufficient awareness of 
the Church as a historical people, personal reflection on the mean- 
ing of the Christian heritage in the student's personal life and in- 
tense efforts at interpreting the Christian message in the unique and 
multifaceted human community of today. 

The Committee on Curriculum spent all of the Winter and Spring 
Quarters of the past school year studying various new curricular 
models from other theological schools, reflecting on the particular 
circumstances present in our school and devising possible models 
for C.T.U. The Committee finally decided to re-structure the cur- 
riculum by stages. The philosophy behind this decision was that 
student involvement in curricular restructuring is indispensable. It 
seemed logical therefore to begin curriculum re-design at the intro- 
ductory level. Pending feedback from that program, a total cur- 
ricular design will emerge. Following is a description of the first 
stage in C.T.U. 's new program: 

A. THE FIRST YEAR PROGRAM: 

1) The major thrust of the introductory or first-year program 
derives from the "action- reflection" model and thus by de- 
sign becomes the responsibility in large measure of the De- 
partment of Christian Ethics and Ministry (CEM). CEM, 
however, presupposes the concomitant courses offered in the 
Departments of Biblical Languages and Literature (BLL) and 
of Historical and Doctrinal Studies (HDS). These latter 
offerings constitute that study of the Christian Heritage which 
provides the student with the context, directionality and mo- 
tivation with which the Christian is able to give a specifically 
and authentically Christian response to his contemporary 
situation. CEM sees its part in this program as that of pro- 
viding an awareness of and involvement in the critical issues 

30 



in this situation and of bringing the student to understand 
and articulate what it means to be a Christian today and 
what it means to be a Christian minister today. 

2) The first-year course offered by the Department of Christian 
Ethics and Ministry therefore is entitled the christian's 

WORLD AND THE CHRISTIAN RESPONSE. It will involve six 

hours in each of the three quarters: the Fall Quarter and the 
Winter Quarter will be devoted to the christian's world, 
the Spring Quarter to the christian's response. 

a. The Christian s World 

Since as Christians we must respond to the Christ-Event 
in and through our 'situation' and since as Christian minis- 
ters we must serve our human brethren as they endeavor 
to do precisely this, the seminarian has to be brought to a 
living awareness of 'where he is at' — not as an individual 
merely, but in terms of his relationships with others, the 
many communities in which he and they exist and live 
and act, and the various structures and institutions that 
these persons and communities live in and are meant to 
be served by. The course on the christian's world 
is intended to create this living awareness. It will address 
' itself to the critical issues of our day and this not only in 

themselves but from the Christian standpoint, i.e., orien- 
tated to discerning how our biblical and theological heri- 
tage can play a part in a meaningful confrontation with 
these issues. 

Such issues will be pointed up in the various spheres 
of human life and human decision. Hence the following 
division : 

Autumn Quarter-, the christian in human community 

(CEM 100) 

THE christian IN THE SOCIAL & POLIT- 
ICAL COMMUNITY (CEM 105) 

Winter Quarter: the christian in the community of 

MARRIAGE (CEM llO) 

THE CHRISTIAN IN THE COMMUNITY OF 

CULTURE (CEM 115) 

This THE christian's world course is not envisaged 
primarily as an academic study. The accent rather is to 
be upon involvement and activity, somewhat after the 
manner of field education. Emphasis will be laid, there- 

31 



fore, upon field trips and the use of resource persons, to- 
gether with group discussion and evaluation. 

b. The Christian Response 

The course in the Spring Quarter is divided into tvv^o sec- 
tions. First, an attempt will be made to focus in on and 
delineate the meaning of the Christian calling in the world 
of today. It will stem from the BLL and HDS study of 
our Chrisitan Heritage, on the one hand, and from CEM's 
THE christian's WORLD course on the other. Second- 
ly, Christian ministry will be discussed from both a doc- 
trinal perspective and an exploration of actual ministries 
as experienced today, together with imaginative and crea- 
tive efforts to discern possibilities for the future. There- 
for the following courses will be offered in the Spring 
Quarter: 

Spring Quarter: christian life & christian living 

(CEM 120) 

CHRISTIAN MINISTRY IN ITS CONTEM- 
PORARY SETTING (CEM 125) 

3) The directorship of CEM's First- Year Program will be the 
joint responsibility of Fathers Nicholas Crotty and John Paw- 
likowski, each of whom will devote himself in a full-time 
capacity to this task. They will function as a team in elabo- 
rating the course more specifically, in directing and organiz- 
ing it and in the more formal teaching that will be imparted 
as part of this program. 

4) Besides the 12 hours programmed for the above CTU First- 
Year Course (i.e., BLL 3 hours, HDS 3 hours, CEM 6 hours), 
there is also a 3-hour session with expert facilitators sched- 
uled each week for one quarter. The aim of these sessions, 
among other things, is to help the students grow in their 
awareness of their own questions and problems as theologi- 
cal students preparing for ministry, to help them evaluate 
the program itself, etc. The facilitators will be reporting 
every four weeks to the Curriculum Committee and twice to 
the entire faculty (after six weeks and at the end of the 
Quarter). 

It is hoped that during the current academic year the experiences 
incorporated into this program will provide solid bases for further 
development of the theological curriculum. 

32 



FIELD EDUCATION 

Field-Education or Apostolic- Action Programs form an integral 
part of the airriculum for professional ministry. The Director of 
Field Education at the Catholic Theological Union is responsible 
for placing individual students in specific and expertly supervised 
action programs. The Department of Christian Ethics and Min- 
istry is responsible for providing opportunities for theological reflec- 
tion growing out of such programs. 

A variety of possibilities for field education exist in the local 
community (Hyde Park-Kenwood area) and the larger Chicago 
metropolis (e.g., chaplaincies in the hospitals, correctional institu- 
tions, jails; the inner-cit)^ apostolate; radio and television communi- 
cations; catechetical and youth counselling programs; various social 
action programs, Newman work, etc.) 

Each student enrolled in the Master of Divinity program will be 
required to spend eighteen quarter hours or the equivalent of two 
quarters in supervised field education programs (students are en- 
couraged to enroll in a Clinical Pastoral Education program for 
one of the quarters). 

The integration of in-service training (or internship) and aca- 
demic programs continues to be the primary challenge in the Master 
of Divinity Program. 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Catholic Theological Union offers two degree programs, the 
Master of Divinity degree (M.Div.), that is, a first professional 
degree in ministry according to the norms laid down by the Ameri- 
can Association of Theological Schools (of which CTU is an As- 
sociate Member) and the M.A. in Theology, the academic graduate 
degree granted by De Paul University in cooperation with the Cath- 
olic Theological Union. 

MASTER OF DIVINITY (M.DIV.) 

The degree of Master of Divinity is the first professional degree 
in Ministry. The Master of Divinity requires at least three years 

33 



of theology, covering all the areas of theological education, that is, 
the fields of Biblical Literature, Historical and Doctrinal Studies, 
and Christian Ethics and Ministry. 

After the First- Year or Introductory Program described above, 
CTU requires a program of core courses for the M.Div. degree; these 
courses are offered every year. There is an equal number of semi- 
nars offered each year to build a certain flexibility into this degree 
program, since each community and individuals within the various 
communities are engaged in a variety of ministries, and indeed 
anticipate yet new forms of ministry. 

REQUISITES FOR THE M.DIV. 

The Master of Divinity degree is earned by the successful com- 
pletion of 106 quarter hours of course work with a grade average 
of "C" or better. The equivalent of two quarters of supervised 
field education is also required. The requirements for the M.Div. 
are broken down thus: 

1) INTRODUCTORY PROGRAM: 

3 Courses in BLL 9 q. hrs. 

3 Courses in HDS 9 q. hrs. 

6 courses in CEM 18 q. hrs. 

Total 36 q. hrs. 

2) UPPER DIVISION COURSES: 

6 Courses in BLL 18 q. hrs. 

7 Courses in HDS 21 q. hrs. 

7 Courses in CEM 21 q. hrs. 

5 Electives ("300" Series) 10 q. hrs. 

Total 70 q. hrs. 

3) FIELD EDUCATION: The equivalent of two quarters of 

supervised field education (cf. p. 30) 

4) A comprehensive "project" that may take the form of either 
a Master's Paper of at least thirty (30) pages, or a compre- 
hensive examination. It is expected that the student's com- 
prehensive "project" will serve as one measure of his profes- 
sional preparation for ministry. 

34 



MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) IN THEOLOGY 

The Master of Arts Program has been worked out cooperatively 
between The Catholic Theological Union and De Paul University, 
the degree being granted by De Paul University. In general the 
Graduate Program offered by the Department of Theology of De 
Paul University requires: 

1) Completion of forty-eight quarter hours of graduate study, 
to which up to eight quarter hours may be applied to the 
thesis. 

a) Eight graduate hours must be taken in the area of Scrip- 
ture; four quarter hours in doctrinal history of systematic 
theology; four quarter hours in religious ethics. 

b) In the allied field the student must take two of the fol- 
lowing courses: Sociology 302 (cultural anthropol- 
ogy), Philosophy 365 (philosophy of religion) or The- 
ology 440 (religious communication). He must also 
choose a seminar in the philosophy department on some 
philosopher pertinent to religious thought. 

c) Thesis: Studnts will register for theology 499 (thesis re- 
search) for eight quarter hours credit. 

2) One foreign language. Evidence of the candidate's reading 
knowledge of theological literature in German, French, Latin, 
Greek, Hebrew, or with special permission, any other language 
in which thesis research will be conducted. 



3) A two-part written comprehensive examination in the field 
of biblical studies, doctrinal history, systematic theology and 
religious ethics, each part taken for three hours. 



4) A one-hour oral examination constituting a "defense of the 
thesis." 



35 



DIRECTIVES FOR CTU STUDENTS IN THE DE PAUL M.A. 
PROGRAM: 

1) PREREQUISITES: 

a) CTU students who wish to enroll at De Paul U. for the 
M.A. in Theology must have completed the prerequisite 
courses, that is, the First- Year Program at CTU. 

b) Each student who wishes to enroll in the graduate pro- 
gram at De Paul U. must present a letter of recommenda- 
tion to the Dean of CTU from the academic supervisor 
of his particular religious community or diocese. 

' 2) REQUIREMENTS FOR THE M.A. IN THEOLOGY: 

a) CTU students registered for the M.A. at De Paul are re- 
quired to take five courses (20 quarter hours) at De Paul; 
the other twenty quarter hours must be taken at CTU. 

b) The Master's Thesis (8 quarter hours) may be written 
under the direction of a faculty member from either De 
Paul or CTU. The student, however, must register for 
Theology 499 at De Paul. 

c) CTU students must follow the area and course require- 
ments, language requirements, etc., as determined by the 
Graduate School of De Paul University. 



PROGRAM IN MISSION STUDIES 

Beginning with the 1970-1971 school year, the Catholic Theo- 
logical Union, in conjunction with the other theological schools in 
the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, is initiating a program 
in Mission Studies. 

The purpose of the program is twofold: to provide the specific 
theological education needed for an ordained minister to serve in 
a culture other than his own; and to make all ordained ministers 
aware of the world-wide mission of the Church and give them a 
deeper understanding of the dynamics of evangelization, conversion 
and community building (cf. Ad Gentes, II). 

36 



The program will be worked out through course offerings, field 
education, symposia and workshops. The full program is currently 
being developed within the Cluster Schools. For the 1970-1971 
school year Bellarmine School of Theology (BST), The Cathohc 
Theological Union (CTU) and the Lutheran School of Theology 
(LSTC) have highlighted the following course offerings in the 
Mission Programs: 

Fall Quarter: 

EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY (CTU) 
THEOLOGY OF MISSION (lSTC-CTU) 
WITNESS AND CONVERSION (CTU) 
HISTORY OF RELIGION (bST) 
ECUMENICAL THEOLOGY (bST) 

Winter Quarter: 

THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE (CTU) 
CHRISTL\N MISSION AND UNITY (lST) 
BUILDING COMMUNITY (CTU) 

Spring Quarter: 

CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS (CTU) 
THEOLOGY OF NON-CHRISTIAN RELIGIONS (bST) 
THEOLOGY OF SIN (COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY) (bST) 
CHRISTIANITY IN THE NON-WESTERN WORLD (lSTC) 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

At a recent meeting, the presidents and deans of seven divinity 
schools formalized the establishment of the Chicago Cluster of The- 
ological Schools. The purpose of the cluster is to share resources 
in order to prepare their students for a more effective ministry in 
today's changing world. Member schools of the cluster include 
Meadville Theological School (Unitarian), Chicago Theological 

37 



Seminary (United Church of Christ), the Lutheran School of The- 
ology, the Catholic Theological Union, and Jesuit Bellarmine School 
of Theology, all in the Hyde Park-Kenwood area, as well as Beth- 
any Theological Seminary (Brethren), Oak Brook, and DeAndreis 
Seminary (Catholic), Lemont. Cooperation among the schools will 
take many forms, such as reciprocal library privilegs, cross-registra- 
tion for courses, faculty exchange and team-taught courses, mutual 
planning for the better use of existing facilities. 

Dr. Malcolm R. Sutherland, Jr., president of Meadville Theo- 
logical School, is serving as chairman of the cluster's Common Coun- 
cil. Dr. Robert J. Flinn of the Catholic Theological Union is 
executive coordinator with offices in the Lutheran School of The- 
ology, 1100 East 35th Street. 

Dr. John Dillenberger, president of the Graduate Theological 
Union, Berkeley, California, addressed the assembled faculties of 
the seven cluster schools at a banquet marking the first such gather- 
ing of more than one hundred faculty members. Dr. Dillenberger 
pointed out that cooperation of this kind makes "new things pos- 
sible in a planned reshaping of the resources at hand," and that 
the churches must take the initiative to "give leadership in a time 
of change." (Press Release from the Coordinator's Office, May 12, 
1970). 



CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

One of the programs sponsored by the Association of Chicago 
Theological Schools (ACTS) is the Chicago Christian Communica- 
tions Center (CCCC). 

The center is under the Directorship of the Reverend Allan W. 
Townsend (McCormick Theological Seminary). Assisting him are 
Rev. Daniel Barrett (Church Federation of Greater Chicago) and 
Dr. LeRoy Kennel (Bethany Theological Seminary). 

Students from all the schools in ACTS may register for courses 
offered by the Center. The courses offered during the 1970-1971 
academic year cover a broad spectrum in the field of communica- 
tions: THE church's broadcast MINISTRY, GOD AND MAN IN CON- 
TEMPORARY CINEMA, THE PRODUCTION OF RELIGIOUS BROADCASTS, 
and RELIGIOUS statement through filmic EXPRESSION. 

CTU students are encouraged to participate in the Center, espe- 
cially those whose ministry will have a particular focus in the field 
of communications. 

38 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Courses offered during the academic year 1969-70 are listed be- 
low: Three departments make up the school of Theology of the 
Catholic Theological Union: The Department of Biblical Literature 
and Languages, the Department of Historical and Doctrinal Studies, 
and the Department of Christian Ethics and Ministry. The courses 
are divided into three series: "100" series (Courses prerequisite to 
graduate work at either the M.A. or M.Div. level); "200" series 
(graduate level courses representing generally the core courses for 
the M.Div. degree); "300" series (graduate level seminars develop- 
ing special questions in biblical, traditional and contemporary the- 
ology). 

N.B. The "100" and "200" series courses are all three quarter- 
hour courses (i.e., three 50-minute classes per week for ten 
weeks); the "300" series are all two quarter-hour courses 
(i.e., two 50-minute classes per week for ten weeks). 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
(BLL) 

Staff: Barnabas Ahern, Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Robert Karris, Cal- 
listus Langerholz, Rabbi Hayim G. Pereknuter, Carroll Stuhimueller. 



BLL 100: OLD TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

Select passages from the books and major traditions of the entire Old 
Testament will be studied against the background of Israel's history, 
religion and literary genres. The primary goal of this course is a con- 
trolled knowledge of the Old Testament in preparation for future in- 
depth study of individual sections. Yearly. STUHLMUELLER 

(Winter) 



BLL 105: NEW TESTAMENT: INTRODUCTION 

A study of the New Testament literature with an attempt to understand 
the canonical writers in their historical and cultural environment as they 
interpret the event of Jesus for their own time. Yearly. 

LANGERHOLZ 
(Fall) 

39 



BLL 115: THE BIBLE: IT'S FORMATION AND 
INTERPRETATION 

The formation of the Bible in terms of the "word" and its revelation 
of God's presence as Savior within the community of faith. The emer- 
gence of a sacred tradition of holy writ, interpreted anew by and for 
each generation. Topics of a special study include: bibHcal inspiration 
and inerrancy; revelation, scripture and tradition; Hturgy and the scrip- 
tures; the senses of scripture; Canon; texts and versions; textual criti- 
cism. Yearly. FOURNELLE and STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 120: BIBLICAL GREEK 

A course tailored to the need of the students who must refresh their 
knowledge of Biblical Greek. Yearly. KARRIS 

(Winter) 

BBL 125: INTRODUCTORY HEBREW 

An introductory course for those who have not previously studied 
Hebrew. Yearly. FOURNELLE 

(Spring) 

N.B. Advanced courses in the biblical languages will be offered by the 
department according to the needs of the students. 

BLL 200: HISTORICAL EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central to the understanding of the O.T. Yearly. 

FOURNELLE 
(Fall) 

BLL 205: SEMITIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE 
Directed research and class discussion, centering on such elements of 
Israehte daily life: Hebrew language as related to biblical Hterature 
and psychology; social life of the people; commerce and industry, labor 
and sports; natural topography, climate and rainfall; etc. 1971-1972. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 210: PRE-EXILIC PROPHECY 

The origin of the "classical" or "writing" Prophets in the unique genius 
of Mosaic Religion and in the early prophetic guilds. An exegesis of 
key passages in Amos, Hosea, and particularly Jeremiah, to appreciate 
their particular reaction to the religious contribution to the prophetic 
movement. 1970-1971. STUHLMUELLER 

(Winter) 

40 



BLL 215: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 

EXILE AND POST-EXILIC PERIODS 
The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. The study will 
be undertaken by means of key texts within the prophets. 1971-1972. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 220: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
other ancient Near Eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms 
as representative of major religious movemnts in Israel. 1970-1971. 

STUHLMUELLER 
(Spring) 

BLL 225: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 
The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 
the "wise men." Retribution considered as thematic to study. 1971-1972. 

FOURNELLE 

BLL 230: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW 

The teaching of Jesus and the preaching of the early Church about 
Jesus. 1971-1972. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 232: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK 
Introduction to Gospel form — and redaction — criticism. Exegesis of the 
Gospel. Mark's place in the theology of the primitive community. 
1970-1971. KARRIS 

(Spring) 

BLL 240: THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JOHN 

John's concept of Jesus. His ecclesiology and soteriology studied in the 
light of his tradition and background. Yearly. LANGERHOLZ 

(Winter) 

BLL 245: STUDIES IN JOHANNINE LIT.: "REVELATION" 

An attempt to portray the Church in its eschatological mission from the 
apocalyptic point of view. 1970-1971. LANGERHOLZ 

(Spring) 

BLL 250: PAULINE THEOLOGY 

Pauline thought seen in his debt to and use of theological and cultural 
traditions and his theological disputes with his opponents. 1970-1971. 

KARRIS 
(Spring) 

BLL 255: PAULINE EXEGESIS: GALATIANS 

Pauline letter form. Paul's theological and cultural milieu. Detailed 

41 



exegesis of epistle. The epistles treated differ from year to year. Gala- 
tians offered. 1970-1971. KARRIS 

(Winter) 

BLL 260: THE THEOLOGY OF BAPTISM AND EUCHARIST IN 
THE GOSPEL OF LUKE 

Within the special setting and purpose of the Gospel, key Lucan passages 
on Baptism and Eucharist will be carefully studied, with the hope of 
formulating the third evangelist's insight into the meaning of these 
sacraments for the community. 1971-1972. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 290: EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 

Theological diversity in the early church as seen through form-critical 
and theological investigations of selected apostolic fathers, apologists, 
aprocryphal and gnostic gospels. Selected examples of the early church's 
theologizing. 1970-1971. KARRIS 

(Winter) 

BLL 301: THE BIBLE AND ETHICAL PROBLEMS 

The imperative of biblical creed and morality today; relevance of cove- 
nant, law and community to personal freedom; salvation within history 
within the eschatological demands, especially of the NT and its worship; 
violence and peace; divine wrath and the morality of hesed agape; 
conversion, renouncement and universal salvation. 1970-1971. STAFF 

(Winter) 

BLL 302: PROBLEM OF AN OT THEOLOGY 

The question to be discussed is the possibility of a "Theology" of the 
OT as differentiated from a "History of religious thought" in the OT. 
Views of Burrows, Eichrodt, von Rad, de Vaux, Vriezen, Wright, etc., 
to be considered. 1970-1971. FOURNELLE 

(Fall) 

BLL 308: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY OF CREATION AND CHAOS 

Creation texts will be studied as indicators of the mystery of salvation, 
in which divine goals clash with human weakness and sinfulness, in- 
ducting chaos, yet leading to a new creation. The course will include 
eschatolo'gy and apocalyptic. 1970-1971. STUHLMUELLER 

(Spring) 

BLL 318: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 

Historico-cultural-religious developments of the period. Jewish apocalyp- 
tic and its influence on the religious thought of the Jews. Implications 
for New Testament study. 1970-1971. FOURNELLE 

(Spring) 

BLL 320: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE I: 

A survey of worship forms in the contemporary American Synagogue 

42 



with special reference to the common thread and variations in the Jewish 
denominations, Orthodox, Conservative and Reform. 1971-1972. 

This course, will, over a two-year cycle, offer the student an in-depth 
view of the entire Jewish Liturgical cycle. PERELMUTER 

BLL 321: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE II: 

The Uturgy of the Day of Atonement. 1970-1971. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 322: CONTEMPORARY JEWISH THOUGHT 

An examination of the basic Jewish influence in contemporary thought 
and the influences shaping Jewish thinkers and theologians of our time. 
Existentiahsm, Mysticism, Zionism as they influence Orthodoxy, Con- 
servatism and Reform as well as the secular scene, will be examined. 
1970-1971. PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 323: LITURGY OF THE SYNAGOGUE III 

Liturgy of the Pilgrim Festivals (Passover, Pentecost and Tabernacles) 
and the "minor festivals" and the Jewish rites de passage. 1970-1971. 

PERELMUTER 
(Spring) 

BLL 324: READING IN RABBINIC LITERATURE I 

Ethics of the Fathers. Careful examination of a Mishna text which gives 

an insight into Rabbinic thought and methology. 1971-1972. 

PERELMUTER 

BLL 325: READINGS IN RABBINIC LITERATURE II 

An examination of Rabbinic interpretation and variations on themes 
from the Book of Genesis. 1971-1972. PERELMUTER 

BLL 326: RABBINIC JUDAISM AND THE EARLY CHURCH 

An examination of the nature of Rabbinic Judaism out of which Chris- 
tianity emerged and with which Christianity co-existed over the cen- 
turies. An effort at achieving an insight into the approach and the mind 
of Rabbinic Judaism through an examination of the pertinent literature. 
1970-1971. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 327: READINGS FROM JEWISH SOURCES I 

Readings from Midrash Mekilta a Rabbinic Commentary on the Exodus. 
1970-1971. PERELMUTER 

(Fall) 

BLL 328: READINGS FROM JEWISH SOURCES II 

A Rabbinic view of the first ten chapters of Genesis as seen through 

43 



readings from Midrash Rabba. 1970-1971 PERELMUTER 

(Spring) 

BLL 335: THE RESURRECTION TEXTS IN THE GOSPELS AND 

ST. PAUL 
The biblical background of the theme of resurrection. The hermeneutic 
of the empty tomb and apparitions. 1970-1971. LANGERHOLZ 

(Winter) 

BLL 355: THE THEOLOGY OF THE "WORD OF GOD" IN NT 
LITERATURE 

Studies on Paul's concept of 'euaggelion,' 'exousia' and John's 'martyria.' 
1971-1972. LANGEROLZ 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
(HDS) 

Staff: Eugene Ahner, Conrad Borntrager (Chairman), Eugene Finnegan, 
Zachary Hayes, Jerome Knies, Hugh McElwain, Lawrence Nemer, 
Gilbert Ostdiek, Donald Skerry. 

HDS 100: DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE EARLY 
CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 

An analysis of emerging theological themes in the early Church Writers 
and Councils. Special emphasis on Christological and Trinitarian themes. 

McELWAIN 
(Fall) 

HDS 102: THE EARLY EXPANSION OF CHRISTIANITY 

A study of the Church as it encounters new cultures — as it moves out 
of a familiar world into a strange world. An analysis of how the new 
affected its institutions, theology and religious life, and of how the 
Christian Community in turn affected the social and political life of the 
world it encountered. Major considerations will be: the Jewish Chris- 
tian Community becoming Greek (Early Theology and Heresies, Basic 
Institutions), becoming Roman (the African Experience, Political- 
Ecclesian Structures, the Golden Age of the Fathers), becoming Byzan- 
tine (Cesaro-Papism and Episcopalism, the Christological and Trinitarian 
Debates, Leo I and Primacy) while at the same time elsewhere becoming 
something new (Barbarian Invasions, Gregory I and a new world). 

NEMER 
(FaU) 

HDS: 105: HISTORY OF THEOLOGY IN THE MIDDLE AGES 

A critical. Christian, theological evaluation of the effort, presupposi- 

44 



tions, and conclusions of a select number of medieval theologians from 
Boethius and pseudo-denis to Pope Leo X: 
I. Neo-platinonism; Qiristian humanism; 
II. Aristotelian metaphysics; the scholastic method; 

III. Nominalism; "The Via Moderna"; 

IV. The notion of reform. 

KNIES 
(Winter) 

HDS: 107: THE CHRISTIANIZATION OF EUROPE 

A study of the Church's encounter with pagan nations, of the evangeli- 
zation and conversion of these nations, of the de^^elopment with Islam, 
of a synthesis of life. An analysis of how the task affected Church life 
and thought, and of how the Church affected the world. Major con- 
siderations will be given to: the Clovis Experience, the Medieval Mis- 
sionary, Charlemagne — an end and a beginning, the creation of the Papal 
States, corruption in the West and enlightenment in the East, the growth 
of a Christian culture: theology, philosophy, social and political struc- 
tures, the encounter with Islam-Crusades, the 13th — Greatest of Cen- 
turies, exile and breakdown. NEMER. 

(Winter) 

HDS 110: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renais- 
sance thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings 
of the Reformers, and the position of Trent. BORNTRAGER 

(Spring) 

HDS 215: TRENDS AND TENSIONS IN THE CHURCH IN THE 

19th & 20th CENTURIES 
This course will include a discussion of theological controversies of the 
19th Century and Vatican I: the Church and liberalism, modernism, 
the biblical, liturgical and ecumenical movements of the 20th Century 
and the Church and totalitarian States, especially Na2i Germany. 

BORNTRAGER 
(Fall) 

HDS 220: DEVELOPMENT OF CATHOLICISI^l IN THE U.S. 
Biographical studies. Special problems and achievements of the Ameri- 
can Church. BORNTRAGER 

(Winter) 

HDS 222: 19th CENTURY EUROPE AND WORLD MISSION 

A study of the Church as it encounters the new world born of the French 
Revolution, of how it affects and is affected by social and political con- 
siderations, of imperialism — Church and State, and of the missionary 

45 



expansion in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major considera- 
tions will be given to: the Church's encounter with French and Italian 
political liberalism, with German philosophical and theological liberal- 
ism, with English scientific and political liberalism; the Church's re- 
sponse in the Syllabus of Errors and Vatican I; Europe in Asia and 
Africa; Mission as Structure; the hesitant growth of local Churches; 
a western Christianity in a non-western world. 1971-1972, NEMER 

HDS 230: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of tlie meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. HAYES 

(Winter) 

HDS 235: THEOLOGY OF ORIGINS AND FINALITY 

An investigation into the question of origins (of cosmos, of man and of 
sin and evil); correlative study of finality (of cosmos and especially of 
its highest achievement, man). McELWAIN 

(Spring) 

HDS 240: CHRISTOLOGY 

An investigation of the structure and meaning of the Christian under- 
standing of salvation with particular emphasis on the problem of Chris- 
tian origins. HAYES 

(Spring) 

HDS 247: THE DYNAMICS OF THE CHURCH 

An exploration of basic church themes through an understanding of the 
relation of Kingdom, Church, World, the meaning of the Body of Christ, 
the development of the ecclesiastical office and ministry, the role of the 
laity, and the meaning of church unity and pluriformity. AHNER 

(Fall) 

HDS 250: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 

Scriptural origins. Early liturgical texts. The Greek theological develop- 
ments. The growth of medieval piety and scholastic doctrine. The 
Reformation dispute. Rediscovery of the meal aspect and other contem- 
porary problems. FINNEGAN 

(Spring) 

HDS 255: SACRAMENTS OF INITIATION 

General sacramental theology and the problem of contemporary symbols. 
Christian initiation, its institutional process and theology. The disin- 
tegration of the initiation structural process and the resultant Western 
theology of baptism and confirmation. The problem of infant baptism, 
physical sacramentalism and the response of faith. FINNEGAN 

(Winter) 

46 



HDS 260: SACRAMENTS OF HEALING AND VOCATION 

Conversion in the New Testament. The process from one conversion 
to many conversions, from pubhc to private penitential structures and the 
theological implications of this change. Prayer for the sick and the de- 
velopment of the "last anointing." Marriage as a secular event and the 
scholastic sacrament of marriage. The laying-on of hands in the New 
Testament. Ordination to a specific function and the necessity for leader- 
ship qualities. FINNEGAN 

(Spring) 

HDS 306: THE THEOLOGY OF HISTORY 

A study of the problem of history in Christian theology including an 
investigation of Augustinian and Bonaventure as well as the impact of 
modern historical consciousness on Christian thought. HAYES 

(Winter) 

HDS 309: THEOLOGY OF GRACE 

Historical perspectives on the doctrine of grace and contemporary the- 
ologizing on the "gracious" presence of God. McELWAIN 

(Fall) 

HDS 313: THE FUTURE OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP 

Contemporary man and the search for sacredness and celebration. The 
structural attempts of man to express his basic beliefs. The Roman 
Catholic experimental procedure. Problems in atmosphere and prayer 
texts. Will the post-secular and post-sexual man be able to pray? 

FINNEGAN 
(Winter) 

HDS 320: THEOLOGY OF KARL RAHNER 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner and its implication 
in his theological writings. HAYES 

(Spring) 

HDS 324: THE THOUGHT OF BERNARD LONERGAN 

An introduction to his thought through a detailed study of Insight (B. 
Lonergan) and The Achievement of Bernard Loner gan (D. Tracy), with 
reference to his later developments in historical consciousness and 
method in theology. AHNER 

(FaU) 

HDS 330: WITNESS AND CONVERSION 

A theoretical investigation of the nature, necessity, qualities and types 
of conversion, based on the theology of Bernard Lonergan. SKERRY 

(Fall) 

47 



C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS AND MINISTRY 
(CEM). 

Staff: Max Behnen, John Boberg, Dismas Bonner, Nicholas Grotty (Chair- 
man), Thomas Cunningham, Dennis Geaney, Sebastian MacDonald, 
Thomas M. Newbold, John Pawhkowski, Donald Skerry. 



GEM 100: THE CHRISTIAN IN HUMAN COMMUNITY 
The aim of this section of the course is to bring the student to a broad 
vision of "human community," viz. of the meaning of man as a per- 
son and how he is to live with and relate to other men so as to be fully 
"man." It will seek to broaden the students' horizons by confronting 
them with different models of community. CEM STAFF 

(Fall) 

GEM 105: THE CHRISTIAN IN THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL 
COMMUNITY 

In this part of the course the accent will be on the key issues and prob- 
lems in society, government, international relations, etc. Brought to an 
awareness of these through a variety of methods, the students will sys- 
tematically reflect on them from the viewpoint of the Christian and the 
Christian minister. GEM STAFF 

(Fall) 

CEM 110: THE CHRISTIAN IN THE COMMUNITY OF 
MARRIAGE 

Is this a crisis for the traditional form of marriage and the family? What 
of marriage vis-a-vis the so-called "sexual revolution"? What today are 
to be envisaged as valid functions and structures of the family? How 
are we, as Christians, to view and respond to these questions and prob- 
lems? CEM STAFF 

(Winter) 

CEM 115: THE CHRISTIAN IN THE COMMUNITY OF 
CULTURE 

Education, art, literature, leisure — these are all elements in the "cultural 
community" which man forms and needs. Here the critical issues for 
"cultural man" will be explored. CEM STAFF 

(Winter) 

CEM 120: CHRISTIAN LIFE AND CHRISTIAN LIVING 

An attempt to focus upon the delineate the meaning of the Christian 
calling in the world of today. It will stem from the BLL and HDS 

48 



study of our Christian heritage, on the one hand, and from CEM's 
THE christian's WORLD course, on the other. CEM STAFF 

(Spring) 

CEM 125: CHRISTIAN MINISTRY IN ITS CONTEMPORARY 

SETTING 
This will involve both a doctrinal study of ministry and an exploration 
of actual ministries as exercised today, together with imaginative and 
creative efforts to discern the possibilities of the future. Hence, it too 
will involve field programs which give the student acquaintance with 
and involvement in the various forms of ministry we can have contact 
with. CEM STAFF 

(Spring) 

CEM 205: CHURCH AND STRUCTURE 

A study of the development of ecclesiological thought and the various 
attempts to concretize the theory, particularly in legal structures. As a 
consequence, the course will involve historical survey as well as the 
contemporary tensions existing between theory and structure. 

CUNNINGHAM 
(Fall) 

CEM 210: THEOLOGY OF SEXUALITY 

This course presents a theological reflection upon the meaning of human 
sexuality — our Christian heritage vis-a-vis the changing mores and ex- 
panding knowledge of sexuality. Special emphasis will be given to 
certain problem areas: premarital sex, masturbation, homosexuality, con- 
secrated virginity. BEHNEN 

(Fall) 

CEM 215: LAW CONCERNING THE SACRAMENTS 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, conciliar norms and pro- 
posed legislation regarding the administration and reception of the 
sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law and practice. 

BONNER 
(Winter) 

CEM 220: LAW CONCERNING RELIGIOUS PERSONS 
Theological background of religious structures and law, current norms 
of law dealing with religious. Principles and practical aspects of reli- 
gious life, its on-going renewal and adaptation. BONNER 

(Winter) 

CEM 225: THE SOURCES OF PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An historical survey of tlie background of contemporary psychotherapy, 
with emphasis on Freud, Jung and the trend toward existential syn- 
thesis in psychotherapy. NEWBOLD 

(Winter) 

49 



CEM 230: HOMILY DESIGN AND PRACTICE 

Practical exercise in homily design and delivery. Written homilies sub- 
jected to group criticism and individual delivery criticism using video- 
tape. SKERRY 

(Autumn) 

CEM 270: THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF SCIENCE & 
TECHNOLOGY 

This quasi-seminar v^ill reply mainly on readings selected with the view 
to understanding what has happened in our country through technology, 
with its impact on man and his ability to respond in faith and freedom 
to the message of the gospel. MacDONALD 

(Winter) 

CEM 280, 285, 290: SUPERVISED FIELD EDUCATION 

GEANEY 
(Autumn, Winter, Spring) 

CEM 305: POWER, CONFLICT AND SOCIAL CHANGE 

Readings, discussion and field interviews dealing with various cencepts 
of power and the use of power and conflict in social change. The use of 
power and conflict by the minister will also be considered. The course 
will attempt to incorporate theological, sociological and psychological 
perspectives. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Spring) 

CEM 306: SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF 
FREUD & JUNG 

A discussion of the Freudian texts on reUgion and morality. Reading 
and discussion of the texts of Jung on the nature of religious experience. 

NEWBOLD 
(Spring) 

CEM 307: THE MEANING AND THE ROLE OF PASTORAL 
THEOLOGY 

To be conducted in a seminar style, this course will, during the first part 
of the quarter, consist of readings, lectures and discussions that seek to 
describe the genesis, structure, purpose and role of a pastoral (applied, 
functional) theology, with the remainider of the course looking to spe- 
cific instances of pastoral involvement, to be subjected to reflection in 
the effort to test the theory against factual situations. 

MacDONALD 
(Fall) 

CEM 309: THE PROBLEM OF CRIME FROM A CHRISTIAN 
PERSPECTIVE 

A study cf crime as a pervasive problem in society: its causes; the re- 

50 



action of society (police, courts, prisons); what our Christian heritage 
has to say about certain sahent aspects: justice, punishment, responsi- 
bihty, the dignity of the human person, Cain's typical response. 

BEHNEN 
(Winter) 

CEM 314: THE CHANGING UNDERSTANDING OF THE 
NATURAL LAW 

An examination of the meaning and place of the Natural Law in our 
traditional moral theology; a study of the changes and restrictions placed 
upon this concept by modern scholarship; an attempt to answer the 
question: Is there a valid meaning and place for an updated concept 
of the Natural Law in contemporary ethical thought? BEHNEN 

(Spring) 

CEM 320: THE RELEVANCE OF EXPERIENCE FOR MORAL 
THEOLOGY 

Dependent on the student's reflective ability, this course will make use 
of discussion especially to come to an appreciation of personal experi- 
ence in Christian living, and especially in that articulation of our ex- 
istence which constitutes moral theology. Thereby, a methodology for 
moral reflection will emerge. MacDONALD 

(Spring) 

CEM 322: READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ETHICS 

Reading and class discussion of contemporary texts which attempt to re- 
late the ethical perspective to the socio-political reahties of present-day 
American society. PAWLIKOWSKI 

(Winter) 

CEM 328: THE THEOLOGY OF MISSION 

Current ecumenical issues such as the missionary nature of the Church, 
evangelism and conversion, witness to and dialogue with men of other 
faiths, participation in the humanizing revolution, the finality of Christ, 
and other topics. BOBERG 

(Fall) 

CEM 330: CONTEMPORARY MISSION PROBLEMS 

A survey of the main issues confronting world mission, such as poverty 
and international development, neo-colonialism, nation-building, messian- 
ism, urbanization /industrialization, the encounter and dialogue with 
other world religions. BOBERG 

(Spring) 

CEM 342: DEVELOPMENT OF CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 

An investigation of the movement from non-community to community 
through the stages of pre-evangehzation, kergyma, and catechesis, the 

51 



relationship of these to community development on the socio-economic 
plane. BOBERG 

(Winter) 

CEM 360: THE CHURCH'S BROADCAST MINISTRY 
A course on the ministry of the Church and the broadcast media. Em- 
phasis on the nature of radio/television, theories of mass communica- 
tions, approaches to religious broadcasting, and the current broadcast 
strategies of the Church, Features videotaped classroom resources and 
trips to Chicago stataions. Two sections. 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(BARRETT-KENNEL) 
(Fall) 

CEM 365: GOD AND MAN IN CONTEMPORARY CINEMA 
An in-depth study of recent feature films by major film artist/philoso- 
phers. Readings in critical literature, screening of key films, theological 
analyses and group discussions, about the work of Bergman, Bunuel, 
Fellini, Antonioni, Kubrick and others. Offered at McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(TOWNSEND) 
(Winter) 

CEM 370: THE PRODUCTION OF RELIGIOUS BROADCASTS 

Students participate in the production of radio and television programs 
for broadcast on Chicago stations. Practice in writing and various as- 
spects of production, as well as on-the-air experience. Limited enroll- 
ment. Prerequisite: the church's broadcast ministry. 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(BARRETT) 
(Winter) 

CEM 375: RELIGIOUS STATEMENT THROUGH FILMIC 
EXPRESSION 

Students study the art of the short films, view significant cinematic ex- 
amples, and make their own individual film statements, in an attempt 
to discover contemporary visual combinations for the communication of 
religious reality. Offered at McCormick Theological Seminary. 

CHICAGO CHRISTIAN COMMUNICATIONS CENTER 

(TOWNSEND) 
(Spring) 



52 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS— 1970-1971 



FIRST YEAR CO 


MMUNITk' OR DIOC 


ALDWORTH, T. 


O.F.M. 


ANICH, K. 


S.V.D. 


AUBREY, K. 


S.V.D. 


BERNARD, R. 


S.V.D. 


BILSKI, T. 


O.F.M. 


BOU, P. 


S.V.D. 


BRINKMAN, F. 


CPP.S. 


BRUMM, G. 


S.V.D. 


CAPALBO, K. 


O.F.M. 


CARLOS, J. 


O.F.M. 


CERTIK, R. 


C.P. 


CHARBONNEAU, G. 


O.S.M. 


CLARK, M. 


C.P. 


COMELLA, G. 


O.S.M. 


DEAN, E. 


O.F.M. 


DLESBOURG, R. 


M.S.C 


FEDERSPIEL, J. 


C.P. 


GREMMINGER, R 


S.V.D. 


GRILLIOT, J. 


S.V.D. 


HANEY, M. 


O.F.M. 


HllGERT, J. 


C.P. 


HORSTMAN, J, 


S.V.D. 


JADCHEW, J. 


CPP.S, 


JENKINS, L. 


S.V.D. 


JESCHKE, R. 


S.V.D. 


KESTERSON, J„ 


O.F.M. 


KMIEC, W. 


O.F.M. 


KRATZ, C 


O.Praem. 


KULLA, R. 


CP. 


KUTSICK, A. 


S.V.D. 


LESCHAK, M. 


S.V.D. 


LUKSETICH, D. 


O.S.A. 


McCABE, M. 


O.F.M. 


MENCSIK, J. 


CPP.S. 


MERl'EN, T. 


O.F.M. 


MISERANDINO, A 


F.M.S. 


MOREY, C 


Soc.of Our Lady 


MROZINSKI, R 


O.F.M. (Conv.) 


NEVILLE, T. 


O.S.A 


NEWMAN, D,. 


O.F.M. 


OVERMAN, ] 


S.V.D. 


POPPE, D. 


C.P. 



HOME 

Chicago, Illinois 
Mukwonago, Wisconsin 
Des Plaines, Illinois 
St. Martinsville, Louisiana 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Chicago, Illinois 
Kalida, Ohio 
Towns vi He, Australia 
Bellwood, Illinois 
Joliet, Illinois 
Chicago, Illinois 
Detroit, Michigan 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Waukegan, IlHnois 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Geneva, Illinois 
Port Washington, Wisconsin 
Campbellsport, Wisconsin 
Versailles, Ohio 
Columbus, Nebraska 
Mason, Michigan 
Cloverdale, Ohio 
Parma, Ohio 
Palm Desert, California 
Elmhurst, Illinois 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Quincy, lUinois 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Detroit, Michigan 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Chicago, Illinois 
Madison Lake, Minnesota 
Troy, Ohio 
Oklahoma, Nebraska 
Vallej' Stream, New York 
Ne^\' York, New York 
South Bend, Indiana 
Chicago, Illinois 
Evergreen Park, Illinois 
Jesup, Iowa 
Louisville, Kentucky 



53 



RECKAMP, R. 
REITHMAIER, P. 

RYAN, J. 
SCHULTE, P. 
SMITH, L. 
SPENCER, W. 
SPERANZA, P. 
STECHSCHULTE, W. 
VON, R. 
WILL, R. 
WOLFF, R. 



S.V.D. 

O.S.M. 
CE 
C.P. 
G.P. 



O.F.M. 
MSC. 
C.PP.S 

CPP.S. 
S.V.D. 



Harvard, Illinois 
Fraakfort, Illinois 
Cleveland, Ohio 
St, Louis, Missouri 
Louisville, Kentuck)- 
West Monroe, Louisiana 
Wheaton, Illinois 
Youngs town, Ohio 
Kewaunee, Wisconsin 
Chickasaw, Ohio 
Da^iron, Ohio 



SECOND YEAR 



COMMliNITY OR DIOCESi: 



BAKER, J. 
BRENNAN, P. 
BUDENHOLZER, F. 
CHENEVEY, R. 
COENS, F. 
CRISTIANI, M. 
CSOTTY, J. 
DANNA, S. 
DAY, J. 
DOLEZAL, R. 
EAGEN, E. 
GUILLORY, C. 
KAVCAK, J. 
KOLEGA, R. 
McGRATH, R. 
MILLER, J. 
OHNER, J. 
PARTHIE, R. 
PATTERSON, J. 
PAWLICKI, J. 
PFEIFER, J. 
QUINN, P. 
RUBALCAVA, J. 
SCHWIETERMAN, D. 
SIMON, M. 
STITH, E. 
SVITEK, J. 
WEBBER, D. 
WILLFORD, R. 
WOZNICK, M. 



M.S.C. 
C.P. 

S.V.D. 
C.PP.S. 
O.F.M. 
O.F.M. (Conv.) 
O.F.M 
O.F.M. 
CP. 

S.D.S. 

M.S.C 

S.V.D. 

M.S.C. 
C.PP.S. 

O.S.A. 
C.PP.S. 

O.S.A. 
O.F.M. 
C.PP.S. 

S.V.D. 
O.F.M. 

O.S.A. 
O.S.M. 

S.V.D. 
C.PP.S. 
C.PP.S. 
C.PP.S. 
C.P. 
O.F.M. 
O.F.M. (Conv.) 



HOME 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Clafendon Hills, Illinois 
Canal Fulton, Ohio 
Quincy, IlHnois 
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 
Riverside, California 
Monroe, Louisiana 
East Alton, Illinois 
Chicago, Illinois 
Smiths Creek, Michigan 
Lafayette, Louisiana 
Nazareth, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph, Missouri 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lima, Ohio 
Chicago, Illinois 
Broadview, Illinois 
Walcottvalle, Indiana 
Bay Cit)', Michigan 
Humphrey, Nebraska 
Evergreen Park, Illinois 
Moline, Illinois 
Celina, Ohio 
La Monte, Minnesota 
Akron, Ohio 
Whiting, Indiana 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Sioux Git, Iowa 
St. Louis, Missouri 



THIRD YEAR 

BEYERINK, W. 
BOWENS, C. 



COMMUNITi^ OR DIOCESE 

O.F.M. 
O.S.M. 



HOME 



St. Louis, Missouri 
County Cork, Ireland 



54 



BROWN, B. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CAMPBELL, J. 


M.S.C. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


c:ardy, W. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


CORBETT, P. 


CS.C 


South Bend, Indiana 


CIREPEAU, J. 


O.S.A. 


Detroit, Michigan 


i:)AVINO, L. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


DOBUCKI, K. 


O.F.M. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


IIGUREL, R. 


M.S.C. 


Altoona, Pennsylvania 


1 ONCK, B. 


O.F.M. 


Elmhurst, Illinois 


i ORSTER, E. 


O.F.M. 


Ecourse, Michigan 


GABRUS, A. 


O.F.M. 


Ashland, Wisconsin 


HAMILL, W. 


O.S.A. 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


JOHNSON, P. 


CP. 


Hillsboro, Ohio 


KIRBY, J. 


S.V.D. 


Rialto, California 


KORDEK, F. 


O.F.M. 


Chicago, Ilhnois 


KD lYLO, P. 


S.V.D. 


Augusta, Georgia 


LACASSE, J. 


S.V.D. 


Granby, Quebec, Canada 


LESSARD, R. 


M.S.C 


East Hartford, Connecticut 


LIEFFORT, R. 


O.Praem. 


Greenbay, Wisconsin 


MAll'INGLY, C 


CP. 


Louisville, Kentucky 


McCarthy, d. 


O.S.M. 


Country Cork, Ireland 


MILLARD, D. 


S.V.D. 


Mackay, Old, Australia 


MORGAN, G. 


O.S.M. 


Amherst, Wisconsin 


O'CONNOR, M. 


O.S.A. 


Chicago, Illinois 


PAYNE, C 


O.F.M. 


Detroit, Michigan 


PICHITINO, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Carlsbad, New Mexico 


PIERK, G. 


S.V.D. 


Germany 


PINS, H. 


S.V.D. 


Earlville, Iowa 


RIEBE, G. 


S.V.D. 


Gardena, Cahfomia 


RUFFNER, C 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


SCHWAB, J. 


S.V.D. 


Deshler, Ohio 


SPRAGUE, J. 


M.S.C. 


Waterton, New York 


STACK, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Whiting, Indiana 


STEINBRUNNER, J. 


C.PP.S. 


Burkettsville, Ohio 


SZUKALA, J. 


O.S.M. 


Chicago, Illinois 


TIMP, F. 


S.V.D. 


Freeport, Minnesota 


VITI, J. 


M.S.C. 


Na2areth, Pennsylvania 


FOURTH YEAR COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


HOME 


ANKRAH, F. 


S.V.D. 


Ghana, Africa 


BACH, J. 


L'^fayette, Indiana 


Chicago, Ilhnois 


BROUILLETTE, P. 


S.V.D. 


Midlothian, Illinois 


CXFNNINGHAM, P. 


O.S.M. 


County Donegal, Ireland 


DARBONNE, S. 


S.V.D. 


Opelonsas, Louisiana 


D'ARCY, W. 


O.F.M. 


Oak Park, Ilhnois 


DE LA O, A. 


Belem Para-Brasil 


Belem, Brazil 


FAHNESTOCTC, J. 


M.S.C 


Alu-ora, Illinois 



55 



FIEDLER, L. 


S.V.D. 


GESCH, P. 


S.V.D. 


GOODLAND, P. 


S.V.D. 


HALPIN, D. 


O.F.M.(Canv.) 


HEIAR, J. 


S.V.D. 


HILL, A. 


O.F.M.(Conv.) 


KNOELL, A. 


O.F.M. 


MULLALLY, T. 


S.V.D. 


O'CONNOR, P. 


O.Praem. 


OFORI, P. 


S.V.D. 


OREY, B. 


O.F.M. 


RUFF, D. 


M.S.C. 


SCOTT, P. 


S.V.D. 


SEGOVIA, P. 


S.V.D. 


SEIDL, R. 




SIMONS, D. 


S.V.D. 


STACHURA, W. 


O.F.M. 


STECK, D. 


O.Praem. 


STOCK, W. 


CPP.S. 


STREVELER, T. 


S.V.D. 


THOMPSON, J. 


O.S.A. 


ULINE, C 


O.F.M. ( Con V.) 


SPECIAL STUDENTS 


COMMUNITY OR DIOCESE 


LYNCH, J. 


Military Ord. 


STUDER, F. 


O.S.B. 



Remsen, Iowa 
Townsville, Australia 
St. Goodna, Australia 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Spraguesville, Iowa 
Lansing, Michigan 
Ames, Nebraska 
Emmett, Michigan 
De Pere, Wisconsin 
Taniefe-Aviete 

(Ghana, Africa) 
Cleveland, Ohio 
West Chicago, Illinois 
Glencoe, NSW, Australia 
HMC, Asuncion, Paraguay 
Chicago, Illinois 
London, England 
Columbus, Nebraska 
East De Pere, Wisconsin 
St. Marys, Pennsylvania 
Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin 
Chicago, Illinois 
Chicago Heights, Illinois 

HOME 

Webb A.F.B., Texas 

CoUegeville, Mimi. 



56